Roots of unity and binomial sums

Thanks to Robert Israel who answered my question in mathstackexchange, we have a generalization of the binomial sums of the previous post.  Interestingly, it turns out roots of unity are involved.  Given,

w = e^{2\pi\, {\rm i}/k}

where k is an even integer then,

\begin{aligned}&\sum_{n=0}^\infty \frac{(2z)^{kn}}{\binom{kn}{kn/2}} = \frac{1}{1-z^k}+\frac{1}{k}\sum_{j=0}^{k-1}\frac{w^j z \arcsin(w^j z)}{(1-w^{2j}z^2)^{3/2}}\end{aligned}

for appropriate z such that the sum converges.  For the special case when,

2z =w^{1/2}=e^{\pi\,{\rm i}/k}

then,

\begin{aligned}&\sum_{n=0}^\infty\frac{(-1)^n}{\binom{kn}{kn/2}}=\frac{2^k}{2^k+1}+\frac{1}{k}\sum_{j=0}^{k-1}\frac{w^{j+1/2} \arcsin(\tfrac{1}{2}\,w^{j+1/2})}{2(1-\tfrac{1}{4}\,w^{2j+1})^{3/2}}\end{aligned}

Note that the terms are complex, but the sum is a real number so they must come in conjugate pairs. The arcsin of a complex root of unity can be given as,

\arcsin(\frac{1}{2}\,e^{\pi\,{\rm i}/k}) = -\arcsin\big(\frac{-a+b}{4}\big)+{\rm i}\ln\Big(\frac{a+b+\sqrt{-6+2ab}}{4}\Big)

where,

\begin{aligned}a &= \sqrt{5+4\cos(\pi/k)}\\ b &= \sqrt{5-4\cos(\pi/k)}\end{aligned}

With this transformation, it is now possible to have an expression all in real terms.  The case k = 2, 4 was given in the previous post.  For k = 6, we have the counterpart to Sprugnoli’s equality as,

\begin{aligned}\sum_{n=0}^\infty \frac{(-1)^n}{\binom{6n}{3n}}&=\tfrac{64}{65}-\tfrac{2\sqrt{26}\,(1+7\sqrt{13})}{3\cdot13^2\,\sqrt{1+\sqrt{13}}}\arcsin\left(\tfrac{-\sqrt{6}}{2\sqrt{5+\sqrt{13}}}\right)\\&-\tfrac{\sqrt{26}\,(-1+7\sqrt{13})}{3\cdot13^2\,\sqrt{-1+\sqrt{13}}}\ln\left(\tfrac{\sqrt{7+2\sqrt{13}}\,+1}{\sqrt{7+2\sqrt{13}}\,-1}\right)-\tfrac{4\sqrt{5}}{3\cdot5^2}\ln\left(\tfrac{1+\sqrt{5}}{2}\right) = 0.95106\dots\end{aligned}

Note that the prime factors of 65 are 5 and 13, and the square root of both appear above. However, for k = 8, while the expression contains the fraction \frac{256}{257} as expected, the argument of the log and arcsin do not factor over the quadratic extension \sqrt{257}, but rather only over \sqrt{2}.  Furthermore, the argument of the log for both k = 6, 8 are no longer simply expressible in terms of the Dedekind eta function, so observations for lower k do not generalize to higher ones.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: